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Medical News Today: Could the common cold ‘revolutionize’ bladder cancer treatment?

Current treatment for some forms of cancer does not work as well as researchers had initially hoped. But a new virus-based treatment has shown promising results. New research suggests that the common cold virus can help scientists devise the next treatment for a widespread form of bladder cancer. Using viruses to treat cancer has long been of interest to medical researchers. One type of virus in particular — oncolytic viruses — can kill tumor cells. But so far, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has only approved one of these:…

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Medical News Today: Why your household dust could fuel the growth of fat cells

Researchers have found that the dust in our households may harbor numerous chemicals that may accelerate the development of fat cells, potentially contributing to obesity. The dust in your house may contain harmful chemicals. In recent years, researchers and international policymakers have expressed concerns about the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals, a class of substances that can interfere with the functioning of the endocrine — or hormone — system. Such substances are sometimes present in household cleaning products, and even in objects that we use on a daily basis. Many plastics,…

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Medical News Today: Colon cancer: Could exercise halt tumor growth?

New research, appearing in the Journal of Physiology, suggests that short bursts of intense, physical activity may reduce the growth of colorectal tumor cells. Could short bursts of high-intensity exercise immediately reduce the growth of colorectal cancer cells? According to the American Cancer Society, doctors will diagnose more than 100,000 new cases of colon cancer and in excess of 44,000 cases of rectal cancer in 2019. Colorectal cancer may also cause over 50,000 deaths this year, researchers predict. Treatment options for colorectal cancer vary from localized therapies to systemic, drug-based…

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Medical News Today: Onions and garlic could protect against cancer

Aside from their ability to inject deep flavor into almost any meal, onions and garlic might also protect against cancer, according to a recent study. A recent study adds to the evidence that allium vegetables reduce cancer risk. Garlic, onions, leeks, chives, and shallots are classed as allium vegetables. They are grown throughout much of the world and form the bedrock of family meals far and wide. Earlier studies have shown that certain compounds in allium vegetables — including flavanols and organosulfur compounds — are bioactive. Some have been shown…

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Medical News Today: New stem cells could be ‘universally transplanted’

Transplants are often a point of crisis, since there is a global shortage of donated organs, but also because there is a high risk that the receiver’s body will reject the donated organ or transplanted tissue. A new type of “universal” stem cells could solve some of these issues. Researchers may have found a way to prevent the immune system from attacking new stem cells that arrive in a person’s body. Recent efforts from a team of University of California (UC), San Francisco, researchers have focused on genetically engineering pluripotent…

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Medical News Today: Diabetes: Could a pill replace insulin injections?

Researchers have developed a new pill that can deliver insulin straight into the stomach wall. Will injections soon be a thing of the past? An easy-to-swallow pill could replace daily insulin injections. When type 2 diabetes is at an advanced stage, the pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin. At this point, doctors usually recommend daily insulin injections to manage blood sugar levels. However, research has cited a phobia of needles as one of the most significant barriers preventing those with type 2 diabetes from taking insulin. By radically changing…

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Medical News Today: Could this chemical help explain anxiety?

A recent study on anxiety examined the role of glutamate, which is a neurotransmitter. The findings could help scientists develop more effective interventions. A new study digs into the neuroscience of anxiety. Almost everybody experiences anxiety in one of its forms. Over time, evolution honed anxiety as a survival mechanism; it forms part of our “fight-or-flight” response. The heart pumps a little faster, and there might be a sensation of nausea as the body prepares for action. Although anxiety is a natural response, it can spiral out of control for…

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